4th of July Party Ideas!

Quickie Garland

08-fourth-of-july-garland-fslTo make your own 4th of July party garland on the cheap, try this trick from Fun Home Things, who cut red, white, and blue plastic tablecloths into strips, and tied them to a set of string lights.

Independence Punch


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A drinkable 4th of July flag! Big Bear’s Wife mixed up a patriotic beverage using cranberry juice, blue Gatorade Frost, Diet 7-Up, and ice cubes for a refreshing party cooler.

Flag Canopy


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Create a classy canopy and mood lighting for your 4th of July party with this genius idea from Style Me Pretty. Tie red, white, and blue paper streamers onto big-bulb outdoor lights, and hang above a picnic table or a grassy dance space.

Muffin Tin Art Caddy


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Vaccuming in High Heels & Pearls created this quick DIY with a muffin tin and some red, white, and blue buttons, beads, and other odds and ends. For a 4th of July party activity, leave it out on a backyard table for kids to string necklaces and bracelets.

Everlasting Snow Cones14-fourth-of-july-snow-cones-fsl

Make snow cones that won’t melt—these beauties are actually Bakerella cupcakes in disguise. A glittery tri-color frosting tops a layered three-color cake that you (and your party guests) have got to see to believe.

Firework Rings

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Make fun fireworks accessories with the kids using this tutorial from Fantastic Fun and Learning. Twist together sparkly tinsel stems (or patriotic-color pipe cleaners) to create cute rings.

Cool Soda Bar

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Desserts on the 4th of July can be used as party decorations with this sweet soda bar idea from Let’s Dish. Group red, blue, and clear soda bottles on a table with small bowls of striped straws, cherries, sprinkles. After the grill is off, bring out ice cream and let guests make their own ice-cream floats.

Have a safe 4th of July weekend! 

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The Montclair Neighborhood

The connection between the infamous “Red Baron” of World War I and the Montclair neighborhood can be found in Baron Manfred von Richthofen- he was the uncle of the “Red Baron” and the father of Montclair! Richthofen arrived in Colorado from Germany in 1877. A man of many interests, he started the Downtown Denver Real Estate Company in 1881, was novelist, and was also the founding member of the Denver Chamber of Commerce. With Matthias P. Cochrane, Richtofen established the Montclair Town and Improvement Company in 1885. Though promoted as a healthy place to live, away from the smoke and fumes of the city, the Montclair neighborhood was not drawing residents. To demonstrate the wonderful quality of life there, the Baron decided to build a castle of his own at 12th and Olive. He had the Montclair ditch created, which was was a lateral of the Highline canal, eventually flowing into Montcalir Park. The water supple enabled many flowers, trees, and shrubs to be planted and to thrive where the land had previously been essentially barren. In 1890, the Baron platted his own addition to Montclair and the building continued. With the Colorado Women’s College (1980) and the Fairmount Cemetery (1980), as well as the increasingly well-known reputation as a community for people suffering from lung-related illnesses, Montclair thrived. It was also home to the National Jewish Hospital and Agnes Memorial Sanatorium, one of the largest tuberculosis treatment centers in Colorado.

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Map of Montclair
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Montclair Park

Parks

Montclair Park

Denison Park

 

Area Information

To Downtown………… 23 min

To Cherry Creek Mall… 13 min

To I-25………….………… 17 min

Grocery Store………. Safeway

 

Walk Score: 56   Bike Score: 73